Loading…
Back To Schedule
Thursday, March 29 • 10:15am - 11:45am
Session: Living with Legacy: Access to Archaeological Data Across Campus and Beyond

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule, view media, leave feedback and see who's attending!

CO-ORGANIZERS:
  • Ann Burns, Metadata Librarian, University of Virginia
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Research Librarian for Art, Archaeology, and Classics, University of Virginia

PRESENTERS:
  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Research Librarian for Art, Archaeology, and Classics, University of Virginia
  • Ann Burns, Metadata Librarian, University of Virginia
  • Louise Putnam, Visual Resources Manager, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Brian Shelburne, Head, Digital Scholarship Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst

We will report on ArchaeoCore’s expanding use in the last five years in national as well as international projects. We have been immeasurably assisted by our colleagues at VRA in our effort to design flexibility into the schema. As a result, ArchaeoCore has been incorporated as the metadata foundation into at least 2 international grants and is accessed on a weekly basis through Academia.edu.

We will discuss the practical aspects of applying a theoretical schema to legacy data “on the ground” by describing our work with the Flowerdew Hundred collection housed at the UVA Library. This has involved working with the curator to design a workflow that incorporates varying formats of legacy data, including photographs, slides, maps, notebooks, artifacts and original site records as well as accommodating data of varying levels of completeness over a period of 20 years.

We will illustrate the flexibility of the ArchaeoCore structure as we continue adapting it to cover materials gathered by Anthropology Professor Judith Zeitlin from excavations in 1973 and 1990 in the region around Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. The original aim of the project, to record data about excavation squares, has grown to embrace not only field notebooks, artifacts and other primary source material, but documentation for theories of cultural change and persistence.

Some collections’ curators feel that only their artifacts need to be described. What support can ArchaeoCore provide when the main focus of a collection is artifact context, arrangement and description? In what ways can the concepts embedded in ArchaeoCore assist with training of new archaeologists?

Thursday March 29, 2018 10:15am - 11:45am EDT
Washington B